Mike Paine
by Mike Paine
March 31, 2020

Ninety-seven percent of consumers say that companies that implement their feedback are likely to see a related increase in their loyalty to that company.

In other words, surveys are not ultimately for you; they’re for your customers.

If you’ve been thinking about surveying your customers, but haven’t received the push you need to move forward, take a look at a few of the key reasons you may want to give it a try:

Give Customers What They Want.

From understanding their service experiences to learning the types of products they feel are missing from your line, surveys help you gain insight into customers and offer them exactly what they need and want.

Make Informed Decisions.

Maybe you’re trying to determine how to best segment your audiences for content distribution, or you’re trying to decide the timing of a new product roll-out. A survey helps you decide.

Learn About Challenges.

A survey helps potential customers identify pain points so you can attempt to solve them. This may also be applied to existing customers in order to better understand their experiences with your company and what could be better.

Build Community.

Depending on the types of questions you include, your survey could serve to encourage a sense of camaraderie among your leads and customers.

Your Competitors Are Using Them.

It’s important to note that since 2012, investment in data analytics has seen an increase of 350%. It’s important to use the tools at your disposal to understand customers, get to know their preferences, and improve their experiences.

Now that you’re convinced that surveys are a good idea for building into your marketing strategy, here are a few good ways to use them:

Identify or Score Leads.

Use a couple of simple questions to gauge a lead’s likelihood to buy, such as, “Are you the key decision-maker when it comes to purchasing X?” or “In the next three months, how likely are you to purchase an X?”

Examine Customer Satisfaction.

As you know, your job isn’t finished once the delivery has been made. Use a quick survey to ask a customer how satisfied they are with your product or service, and then ask them how likely they are to recommend your company to someone else.

Test a Concept.

You’re considering a new, edgy product, but you wouldn’t mind a little insight into demand for such a product before you start mobilizing teams. A survey is a great way to find out whether it would solve any problems or fill a need for your customers.

Surveying definitely has its place in a successful marketing strategy, but convincing a customer to take the survey can require its own strategy. How do you get people to pause long enough to answer a few questions?

Try a little reward. Think about offering a small gift, such as a discount code or even a gift card for a local coffee shop. If this is too rich a cost for data, think in terms of entering the participants in a drawing, or partner with a local event or store for some giveaways.

Better Engagement.

Bet you didn't think that! Many studies have been conducted that show that by having the customer "work" for an offer gives that offer a higher perceived value. With that "higher value" comes more redemption. Read all about the Psychology of Direct Response. 

Surveys are just a small piece of a comprehensive marketing automation strategy. DirectMail.io has a streamlined, very user friendly survey system built in, allowing customers to answer your questions via SMS, phone call, and online.

If you're looking for a more efficient marketing solution, simple to use, with robust features, take a tour of DirectMail.io. We have a simple survey ready for you to see if it's the right platform for you.  See if it's a fit now »

Mike Paine
by Mike Paine
March 31, 2020